How Often Should I Brush My Dog

How Often Should I Brush My Dog

Many people have asked me this question, How Often Should I Brush My Dog? For starters, brushing your hound is indispensable. As a matter of fact, it is among the things you have to do to keep the pooch’s fur clean, healthy, appealing, and reduce grooming costs. Regular brushing of your pooch’s coat enables you to be familiar with his body, noticing the slightest of unusual signs that may need professional attention and further enabling you to create a bond with your pet. Brushing sessions are required to be maintained on a regular basis and may vary depending on the breed of your dog, type, and length of its coat.

So, How Often Should I Brush My Dog?

By brushing your dog, you help in: the removal of dead debris, the spread of natural oil, stimulation of its skin surface, remove mats, and seasonal shedding (in fall and spring) depending on breed and type of coat. Frequently brush your dog in case it’s a breed with long hair, as they are prone to form mats more easily.

Essential Grooming Tips

Be mindful of the types of brushes you are using on your pooch. The type of brush used varies with and is unique to the breed and the type of coat your dog has.

Remove mats from your dog’s fur before brushing with a regular grooming brush. Use a DE matting comb to remove the mats in careful picking motions, breaking up the mats without hurting the pooch. Work in section in case your dog has a thick undercoat.

Use DE shedder tools to remove excess hair before brushing in case your dog is of a breed prone to shedding and with a thick undercoat.

After removal of the matted hair, brush your dog’s fur. Work in the direction in which his fur grows and start close to your pet’s skin to make work easier.

Brush your pet’s coat while dry, but in case you want to brush it after a bath is sure to let it dry, as wet hair is prone to get matted more easily and form tighter knots making it difficult for you to work through them.

Use detangling spray comfortable with the dog’s skin and fur in case you intend to make the brushing easier.

How Often Should I Brush My Dog?

The basic considerations when it comes to how often you should brush your dog are its breed and type of coat (texture, length, and thickness). From this we will be able to know how frequently to brush his fur, what type of brushes to use, and the required number of visits to a professional groomer. While these are the basic consideration, different dogs require different kinds of attention depending on prevailing health, nature of mat formation, and their age, just to mention a few.

Consider the following:

  1. Short and very smooth with little or no undercoat belonging to Doberman, Pugs, Pinschers, and Basenjis dog breeds. Use a bristle brush and the hound glove. Brush once a week with recommended professional grooming every 4 to 6 weeks.
  2. A short and wiry coat that is thick and coarse with a short undercoat belonging to Airedales, Schnauzers, Wirehaired hounds, and Terriers dog breeds. Use a slicker brush and medium/fine-tooth comb. Brush twice a week. Professional grooming recommended every 6 to 8 weeks.
  3. Short and double-coated, with a topcoat that is straight or wavy and an undercoat that is soft and thin belonging to Rottweiler and Labrador retrievers breeds. Use: Slicker brush, Fulminator, Undercoat rake, and medium /fine-tooth comb. Brush twice per week. Professional grooming recommended every 6 to 8 weeks.
  4. Long and silky with no undercoat belonging to the Silky terriers, Yorkshire terriers, and Maltase dog breeds. Use a slicker brush and medium/ fine-tooth comb. Brush 3 to 4 times a week with recommended professional grooming every 4 to 6 weeks.
  5. Curly or wavy, either soft or coarse, belonging to the breeds: Kerry blue terriers, Poodles, and Bedlington terriers. Use a slicker brush and medium/fine-tooth comb. Brush 3 to 4 times a week. Professional grooming recommended every 4 to 6 weeks.
  6. Long and coarse, with a straight or wavy coat that is thick and heavy, typical with Tibetan terriers, Shih Tzu and Lhasa Apse dog breeds. Use a slicker brush, pin brush, and Medium/Fine tooth comb. Brush 3 to 4 times a week with recommended professional grooming every 4 to 6 weeks.
  7. Long and double-coated, straight coarse outer coat and a thick, heavy undercoat, common among Samoyeds, Collies, and Chow chows dog breeds. Use a slicker brush, undercoat rake, and medium/fine-tooth comb. Brush 2 to 3 times a week with recommended professional grooming 6 times a year.
  8. Hairless with no hair or minimal hair on the head, tail, and paws belonging to the breeds: Xoloitzcuintli and Chinese crested. Use a bristle brush and hound glove. Apply an oil-free sunscreen with SPF 15+ when outside and an oil-free moisturizer daily.

Conclusion

As the dog parent, it is upon you to take care of your dog’s coat through regular brushing. Brushing your dog regularly not only keeps the dog looking good, but also helps remove dead hair, eliminates excessive shedding, eliminates mats, and evenly spreads the natural oils in the skin to keep your dog healthy. Brushing could also be an opportunity to bond with your dog. Give him a treat afterward so that he can be able to relate the reward to his good behavior. If you are trying to introducing the brushing sessions to your pooch, you should start out with short sessions and as time goes by, you can increase the duration more to enable them to adapt to it slowly until such a point that they are totally comfortable.

 

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